Partly Cloudy
Monday 12/18 10%
Partly Cloudy
Partly cloudy. Low 0C.
Mostly Cloudy
Tomorrow 12/19 10%
Mostly Cloudy
A mix of clouds and sun early, then becoming cloudy later in the day. Turning warmer. High 7C. Winds light and variable.
Fog
Wednesday 12/20 20%
Fog
Cloudy skies with some morning fog. Not as cold. High 11C. Winds WSW at 10 to 15 km/h.

Please follow this link to read a detailed history of the area

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66542

 

Looking Back Over the Years – David Webb

My first experience of Lyneham was in 1938 when the RAF had acquired land where the airbase now stands. Considerable amounts of this land was made up of farms but they did not buy many of the houses or buildings although some were complete farms one of which was Moat Farm where they had to have a farm sale.

My father came to buy a chicken house. I accompanied him to collect it. The first and last time I came up Lyneham Bank on a horse and cart. What an experience that was.

In 1956 I moved to Pound Farm and by then tractors were power of the day on farms. A firm named Monk was extending the runway and the number of lorries up and down Lyneham Bank was enormous, when they were fully loaded they were slower than the tractors.

Where Pound Close is now was a W.A.A.F. site during the war and at that time they were due to be handed back to the previous owner. Workers from Monks were living in the wartime huts. They were very lucky as the huts were the only part of the village on main sewerage, put in by the RAF during the war. At weekends the pubs were very busy as the Monks workers were very thirsty after a weeks work.

Where the extension to Pound Close is now, number 40 upwards, this had belonged to Pound Farm before the war. It had been handed back to the previous owner who kept pigs and chickens in the huts, still with flushing toilets. Eventually the Cricklade and Wootton Bassett Council bought the land. There was opposition to this as local people did not want any more council houses.

The RAF were rapidly expanding the married quarters because at that time only Lancaster Square, Harrow Grove and Hastings Drive were built and part of the officers’ quarters. During the next ten years the quarters, as we know them, were finished.

The old school was still being used and a new one was being built. There were also schools in Bradenstoke and Tockenham that were closed and the children came to Lyneham.

The RAF station was very acceptable and helpful to the villagers who were allowed to use the facilities on the camp. It was during the time of the Northern Ireland crisis that security was increased and the villagers were not so involved.

In the early 1960 the RAF took over the churches and the Padres on camp were also ministers to the village. We had the Church of England Padre in charge of the Parish Church in Lyneham and Bradenstoke, the Free Church Padre for the Methodist Church, and a Roman Catholic Padre so eventually a Catholic Church was built down Preston Lane next to the Naafi. I would say the relationship between the RAF base and the village was different to anywhere else in the country.

Now we’re having more changes with the M.O.D taking over the base

By David Webb
Pound Close
Summer 2014

Looking back over the Years – David Webb

My first experience of Lyneham was in 1938 when the RAF had acquired land where the airbase now stands. Considerable amounts of this land was made up of farms but they did not buy many of the houses or buildings […]

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